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Teacher Academy

Program Overview:  

The Teacher Academy of Maryland is a Career and Technology Education (CTE) instructional program that aligns with the Interstate Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium (InTASC) and the Maryland Essential Dimensions of Teaching (EdoTs).  The program prepares students for further education and careers in the education profession.  The program consists of four high school credits that focus on teaching as a profession, human growth and development, learning theory, and curriculum and instruction.  These credits are designed to articulate to a Maryland post-secondary teacher education program.  Upon completion of the program and passing the ParaPro test, high school graduates are ready for employment in the teaching profession. This program is based on the outcomes of the Maryland Associate of Arts in Teaching (A.A.T.) degree, which aligns with the National Council for the Accreditation for Teacher Education (NCATE) standards.

 

Students are expected to:

  • Identify the current, historical, philosophical, and social perspectives of American education, including trends and issues.
  • Demonstrate an understanding that knowledge of the learner’s physical, cognitive, emotional, social, and cultural development is the basis of effective teaching.
  • Explore learning theories as antecedents to current educational practice.
  • Identify research-based practices in teaching and evaluate their appropriateness for various educational situations.
  • Explore curriculum delivery models in response to the developmental and cultural needs of all children.
  • Use instructional technology to meet student and professional needs as guided by the Maryland Teacher Technology Standards.
  • Demonstrate proficiency in reading, writing and mathematics, and, if appropriate, a secondary content area, in preparation for entry into the workforce and/or post-secondary education.
  • Participate in internship experiences that include exposure to multiple age levels and subjects, including critical shortage areas.
  • Explore the career opportunities within the Human Resources Services Cluster and career opportunities and employment requirements within the Education and Training Services pathway.

 

The Teacher Academy of Maryland consists of the following four courses:

 

  1. Human Growth and Development through Adolescence
  2. Teaching as a Profession
  3. Foundations of Curriculum and Instruction
  4. Education Academy Internship

 

Course Title:  Human Growth and Development through Adolescence (1 credit)

  • Teacher Education Outcomes for the AAT
  • Teacher candidates know and understand the social, physical, emotional, and cognitive stages of development through adolescence.
  • Teacher candidates possess knowledge of exceptionalities and individual differences and understand how culture and experience affect these.
  • Teacher candidates understand the important role of family in human development and the variety of ways individuals can organize to fulfill these roles.
  • Teacher candidates know and articulate the value of life-long learning.
  • Teacher candidates begin an INTASC-based “developmental portfolio” that includes reflections on their developing schema of the teaching profession.
  • Teacher candidates engage successfully in critical thinking and problem solving in a variety of content areas.

 

Course Description:  This course focuses on human development from birth through adolescence.  Emphasis is placed on theories of physical, cognitive, and psychosocial development, the effect of heredity and the environment, the role of caregivers and the family, health and safety concerns, and contemporary issues.  Students explore special challenges to growth and development.  Students will have opportunities for guided observation of children from birth through adolescence in a variety of settings to help students further understand theories of human development.  Students will begin to develop the components of a working portfolio to be assembled upon completion of the internship.

 

Students will:

  • Identify the stages of physical, cognitive and psychosocial development of children from birth through adolescence.
  • Compare and contrast major theories of child and adolescent development.
  • Analyze the effect of relationships between the child and the family and/or caregivers on the child’s growth and development through adolescence.
  • Investigate the role of the environment on child and adolescent development.
  • Recognize the needs of children with physical, intellectual, social, and emotional differences.
  • Explore the impact of technology on human growth and development
  • Identify contemporary family and societal issues and analyze their effect on human growth and development.
  • Perform formal and informal guided observations using a variety of data collection tools and techniques.
  • Explore career pathways in the Human Resource Services Cluster with emphasis on careers in education.

 

 

 

Course Title:  Teaching as a Profession (1 Credit)

  • Teacher Education Outcomes for the AAT
  • Teacher candidates know the major approaches to (theories of) human learning.
  • Teacher candidates recognize valid sources of educational information.
  • Teacher candidates know and understand the roles of secondary school teachers.
  • Teacher candidates distinguish between the roles of middle school and high school teachers.
  • Teacher candidates understand schools as organizations.
  • Teacher candidates understand the impact of culture, privilege, and oppression, as they influence personal growth and development.
  • Teacher candidates relate issues to their historical, social, cultural, philosophical, education antecedents or analyze the historical, social, cultural, philosophical, and educational antecedents in relation to contemporary issues.
  • Teacher candidates know a variety of patterns of secondary school organization.
  • Teacher candidates know fundamental/basic rudiments of school law.
  • Teacher candidates relate culture, privilege and oppression to their impact on schooling, student performance and success.
  • Teacher candidates understand factors that may contribute to behaviors/conditions resulting in at-risk students.
  • Teacher candidates identify contemporary education issues.
  • Teacher candidates know the history of education.
  • Teacher candidates know, understand, and give reason for the ethical standards of the teaching profession.
  • Observation of teachers in action.
  • Characteristics of adult learner US K-12
  • Teacher candidates reflect on the approaches to learning/teaching.
  • Teacher candidates develop a philosophy of education and relate this to purposes of education.
  • Teacher candidates know the various ways that teachers collaborate with others.
  • Teacher candidates know and articulate the value of life-long learning.
  • Teacher candidates continue to add to an INTASC-based “developmental portfolio” that includes reflections on their developing schema of the teaching profession.
  • Teacher candidates understand the important role of family in learning and recognize teachers’ vital role in creating a partnership with families.
  • Teacher candidates engage successfully in critical thinking and problem solving in a variety of content areas.

 

 

Course Description:  This course focuses on the profession of teaching – its history, purposes, issues, ethics, laws and regulations, roles, and qualifications.  Emphasis is placed on identifying the current, historical, philosophical and social perspectives of American education, including trends and issues.  Students will explore major approaches to human learning.  Students will participate in guided observations and field experiences in multiple settings to help them assess their personal interest in pursuing careers in this field and to identify effective learning environments.  Students will continue to develop the components of a working portfolio to be assembled upon completion of the internship.

 

Students will:

  • Identify the roles of teachers at various levels of education.
  • Investigate the impact of contemporary education issues on the role of teachers and operation of schools.
  • Compare and contrast the major approaches to theories of human learning.
  • Recognize valid sources of educational information.
  • Describe characteristics and patterns of schools as organizations.
  • Identify fundamental/basic rudiments of school law.
  • Chart major events in the history of education.
  • Analyze factors that promote and hinder student performance and success.
  • Explain and justify the ethical standards of the teaching profession.
  • Articulate a philosophy of education and relate this to purposes of education.
  • Perform guided observations at the elementary and secondary levels to identify characteristics of an effective classroom and teacher and to reflect upon their own personal career goals.
  • Participate in one-on-one tutoring and small group instruction under the supervision of the classroom teacher.
  • Examine the educational and licensing requirements for entering and advancing in educational careers including a variety of content areas and critical shortage areas.

 

 

Course Title:  Foundations of Curriculum and Instruction (1 credit)

  • Teacher Education Outcomes for the AAT
  • Teacher candidates understand basic theories of motivation.
  • Teacher candidates know that there are different approaches to and methods of teaching.
  • Teacher candidates recognize instructional practices that enhance, or impede critical thinking, problem solving, and performance skills.
  • Teacher candidates know what curriculum is and identify the social, cultural, historical, political, and philosophical influences that effect the development and change of curriculum.
  • Teacher candidates recognize that there are different approaches to teaching and that materials and objectives are specific to the approach selected.
  • Teacher candidates understand the construction of curriculum as responsive to developmental, cultural, and social needs of children.
  • Teacher candidates reflect on the approaches to learning/teaching.
  • Critique lesson plans.
  • Develop lesson plans.
  • Teacher candidates know and articulate the value of life-long learning.
  • Teacher candidates continue to add to an INTASC-based “developmental portfolio” that includes reflections on their developing schema of the teaching profession.
  • Teacher candidates understand the important role of family in learning and recognize teachers’ vital role in creating a partnership with families.
  • Teacher candidates engage successfully in critical thinking and problem solving in a variety of content areas.

 

 

Course Description:   This course explores curriculum delivery models in response to the developmental needs of all children.  Emphasis is placed on the development of varied instructional materials and activities to promote learning, classroom management strategies, and a supportive classroom environment.  Students will explore basic theories of motivation that increase learning.  Students will participate in guided observations and field experiences to critique classroom lessons in preparation for developing and implementing their own.  Students will continue to develop the components of a working portfolio to be assembled upon completion of the internship.

 

Students will:

  • Evaluate instructional strategies appropriate for diverse student needs and learning styles.
  • Utilize instructional technology to meet student and professional needs as guided by the Maryland Teacher Technology Standards.
  • Identify research-based practices in teaching and evaluate their appropriateness for various educational situations.
  • Identify social skills needed to perform well in a group.
  • Identify classroom behaviors that help or hinder the learning process.
  • Prepare long-term and short-term instructional plans including their area of teaching interest.
  • Develop appropriate assessments to evaluate student progress.
  • Propose possible classroom management plans that increase student productivity and decrease student disruption.
  • Observe and critique classroom teachers in multiple grade levels and subjects for appropriate instructional practices and classroom management procedures.
  • Refine their philosophy of education with consideration of the social, cultural, historical, political, and philosophical influences that affect the development and change of curriculum.
  • Design lessons under the supervision of a mentor teacher that address diverse student needs and learning styles and incorporate theories of motivation learning.
  • Participate in instructing small and large groups of students under the supervision of the classroom teacher.
  • Explore the ways teachers engage in continual professional development.

 

 

Course Title:  Education Academy Internship (1 credit)

  • Teacher Education Outcomes for the AAT
  • Teacher candidates understand the important role of family in learning and recognize teachers’ vital role in creating a partnership with families.
  • Teacher candidates develop a philosophy of education and relate this to purposes of education.
  • Teacher candidates know the various ways that teachers collaborate with others.
  • Options to work in variety of grade/subject areas will be provided to teacher candidates.
  • Teacher candidates will have opportunities to take ParaPro.
  • Teacher candidates know and articulate the value of life-long learning.
  • Teacher candidates continue to add to an INTASC-based “developmental portfolio” that includes reflections on their developing schema of the teaching profession.
  • Teacher candidates engage successfully in critical thinking and problem solving in a variety of content areas.
 

Course Description:  The internship is the culminating course of the Education Academy Program.  Students will have an opportunity to integrate content and pedagogical knowledge in an educational area of interest.  They will have an opportunity to extend and apply their knowledge about teaching in a classroom setting under the supervision of a mentor teacher.  The students will complete their working portfolio and present it for critique.

Students will:

  1. Observe and critique classroom teachers for appropriate instructional practices and classroom management procedures.
  2. Collaborate with the mentor teacher and other teaching professionals to develop lessons, select instructional resources, and develop classroom management procedures.
  3. Demonstrate teacher planning to meet instructional goals.
  4. Demonstrate teaching skills that support learners and the development of subject matter knowledge.
  5. Implement lessons that address diverse student needs and learning styles and incorporate theories of motivation and learning.
  6. Create and maintain an effective learning environment.
  7. Utilize assessment to improve teaching and foster learning.
  8. Identify the important role of the family and caregivers in the learning process.
  9. Utilize instructional technology to meet student and professional needs as guided by the Maryland teacher technology standards.
  10. Engage in critical thinking and problem solving in a variety of content areas.
  11. Assemble and present for a juried review a working portfolio that includes reflections on their developing schema of the teaching profession.
  12. Prepare to take the appropriate assessment for post-secondary entry consistent with their career choice.

 


The Maryland State Teacher Academy is designed to prepare high school students for future careers in the education profession. Students who wish to explore possible careers as teachers, paraprofessionals, guidance counselors, child psychologists, youth workers, and camp directors will develop fundamental knowledge, skills, and dispositions to prepare them for an education degree. The program includes traditional classroom instruction, field experiences at various grade levels, the creation of a professional portfolio, and ultimately, a professional internship completed with an experienced teacher.